175 Emigrant Lake Road, Ashland, OR 97520
(412) 735-0295 • Email UsTeamSnap

What is Adaptive Rowing?

Adaptive rowing is the sport of sweep rowing or sculling for people with physical or intellectual impairments. An adaptive rower is a rower who requires modifications to equipment, coaching and program structure to allow for maximum functionality of the rowing stroke.

An adaptive rower may be a person who has, but is not limited to, Autism, limb amputation, joint limitations, blindness, visual impairment, paraplegia, quadriplegia, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, Down syndrome, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

(cited from USRowing website)

Program Info

FREE Welcome Days

When: Sunday, April 30 th 9:30am-11:30am AND/OR Sunday, May 7 th 12pm-2pm

Where: Rogue Rowing Boathouse: 175 Emigrant Lake Rd., Ashland

Full Program Dates: May-July (exact on the water rowing times/days TBD after welcome days based on rower availability)

Cost for full program: $65 for May – July rowing 1 day per week, $95 for May – July rowing 2 days per week

Adaptive Rowing Classifications:

1) Legs, Trunk, Arms (LTA) – for athletes who are able to use at least one leg, their trunk, and their arms, and for those with visual impairments or cognitive impairments.  LTA athletes typically row in standard sculling or sweep shells with sliding seats, with the option of adding pontoons for extra stability. The LTA Mixed 4+ is the focus in this category for international competition.

2) Intellectual Disabilities (ID) – for athletes who meet the eligibility criteria established by the International Sports Federation for Persons with an Intellectual Disability (INAS-FID) and have completed the athlete eligibility application and have been issued with a INAS-FID Athletes Card.  The ID Mixed 4+ is the focus in this category for international competition.

3) Trunk and Arms (TA) – for athletes who are able to use only their trunk muscles.  The shells used by these athletes generally have fixed seats and pontoons for added stability, and sculling is most common. The TA Mixed 2x is the focus in this category for international competition.

4) Arms and Shoulders (AS) – for athletes with limited trunk control.  The shells these athletes row have fixed seats and pontoons for stability, and the rower is strapped to the fixed seat both at the waist and at the upper chest level, to allow only shoulder and arm movements. The AS1x for men and women is the focus in this category for international competition.

(cited from Three Rivers Rowing Association Website)

Coaches

Lia Byers

Toni Martinez

Marielke Funke

Questions

Email Lia Byers, liabyers@mind.net, or contact her at 541-621- 9265